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 Let’s say you want to do a quick analysis of a stock. Perhaps you’re just looking to give the tires a good kick. Alternatively, you rely on charts and want to make sure the fundamentals are in your favor… or at least not against you. What should you look at? The following...

 Pessimism among individual investors about the short-term direction of the stock market fell to its second-lowest level of the year as optimism rebounded to a 11-week high. The latest AAII Sentiment Survey also shows neutral sentiment falling below 40% for the first time...

 This week’s AAII Weekly Digest highlights these “must-read” AAII articles:   Tracking the S&P 500 With Mutual Funds and ETFs There are more than 40 mutual funds and exchange-traded funds (ETFs) widely available to investors that explicitly list the...

 AAII Journal Editor Charles Rotblut explains to Chuck Jaffe why DryShips (DRYS) is his “Sell of the Week” for July 18, 2017, on the MoneyLife Radio Program. MoneyLife is a daily personal finance show that sorts through the financial clutter to bring you the information...

 The aging process can hurt your ability to make proper decisions about your finances. On average, 29.2% of individuals aged 80 to 89 have cognitive impairment. While the aging process affects everyone differently, it is important to protect the investment portfolio you have...

 In mutual fund investing there are no immutable laws to guide us, as we have in physics. But then again, it’s not professional wrestling either. Some of what follows distills the collective experience of mutual fund investing; some of it has empirical evidence pointing...

 Weekly Market Summary U.S. stocks awoke from their mid-Summer slumber this week. The Dow Jones industrial average hit multiple record highs this week and the S&P 500 hit another new all-time close, too. Meanwhile, tech stocks posted a strong week, too, as the Nasdaq Composite...

 This week the second-quarter earnings season kicked off for the stocks in the SSR tracking portfolio. This marks the period when companies report their earnings for operations that fell primarily within the second calendar quarter of the year, although not all companies are...

  In its purest form, value investing involves solely buying cheap companies. Just cheap companies. Studies of valuation either use high minus low (buying the cheapest stocks and shorting the most expensive stocks) or separate stocks into deciles (10 evenly split groups) or...

 This week’s Sentiment Survey special question asked AAII members how they perceived the performance of the stocks they own or follow relative to the year-to-date returns of the S&P 500. The majority of responses fell into one of two groups. The first group, accounting...