AAII Home AAII Blog

Excel spreadsheet automatically derives financial ratios for company analysis after a simple import of financial statement data from Morningstar.com. Read more »  ...

While it is hard to argue with how much technology has made investing easier, there are always two sides to every coin. Read more »  ...

This month marks several changes here at Computerized Investing. We begin by saying goodbye to Joe Lan, who has been accepted to the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business, where he will start his pursuit of an MBA degree this fall. For nearly the last four years,...

A discussion of Luke Wiley’s approach to stock-picking and how to build a screen using his five filters. Read more »  ...

Welcome to Computerized Investing’s “Best of the Web.” Here we have brought together what we consider to be the “best of the best” when it comes to online investment analysis, research and tracking. These are the sites that we editors and staff of CI use ourselves, almost...

As you may know, Microsoft stopped supporting its venerable Windows XP operating system on April 8. Back in March I had written that, by some estimates, almost 30% of the world’s computers were running XP, which adds up to some 300 million machines. Here we are, nearly six weeks...

Closed-end funds (CEFs) are similar to traditional open-end mutual funds in that professionally managed investment companies pool investors’ capital and invest in stocks, bonds or other securities according to an overriding investment objective. However, there are several key...

Using a high-low price range to identify potential trend reversals based on range expansions. Read more »  ...

Even since I got my first iPhone a few years ago, it’s been protected by a case. Part of this stems from losing my last non-iPhone to a catastrophic drop. However, recently I’ve been using a battery case that pulls double duty—protecting my investment and extending its battery...

The year 2013 was great for the stock market, with each of our major indexes finishing up more than 25%. If you were one of the lucky (or unlucky, as the case may be) investors who managed to lock in gains in taxable accounts, you have capital gains taxes to look forward to. Whatever...