Finding Value and Financial Strength Based on “What Works on Wall Street”

Posted on April 16, 2014 | AAII Journal

Investors seem to be programmed by nature to fail at investing, pouring money into last year’s hot stock, industry or asset class.

James P. O’Shaughnessy provides a detailed examination of investment strategies in the fourth edition of his book “What Works on Wall Street: The Classic Guide to the Best-Performing Investment Strategies of All Time” (McGraw-Hill, 2011).

O’Shaughnessy argues that the majority of investors fail to beat market averages because they do not follow a disciplined approach to investing. Instead, investors let the emotions surrounding the market overpower their judgment and push them off their planned investment course. Investors tend to chase investments with the best recent performance, while ignoring anything that happened more than three to five years ago. Furthermore, O’Shaughnessy makes the case that the markets are not random. The stock market does not move around without any rhyme or reason; it “rewards certain investment strategies while punishing others.”

Read more »