AAII Survey: Dividend Reinvestment Plans (DRIPs)

Dividend reinvestment plans or DRPs/DRIPs are offered by many companies to give shareholders the option of reinvesting the amount of a declared dividend by purchasing additional shares. Normally, when dividends are paid, they are received by shareholders as a check or a direct deposit into their bank account. Because shares purchased through a DRIP typically come from…

 

12 Characteristics to Look for From a Dividend-Paying Stock

This week’s AAII Weekly Digest highlights these “must-read” AAII articles:   Dividends Are Still Valuable Though certainly not as sizeable a contributor so far in the 21st century, over time, dividend income and its reinvestment has comprised a significant portion of long-term stock gains. Even better, over the long term, dividend-paying stocks have delivered relatively…

 

Screening for Dividend Income

This week’s AAII Weekly Digest highlights these “must-read” AAII articles:   Reinvesting Dividends The approach used in managing AAII’s Dividend Investing portfolio is to allocate proceeds received from dividend payments to cash. The cash, along with any proceeds from the sale of holdings in excess of the average size of all DI holdings, is then…

 

Top Blog Posts for August

Here are the most-read blog posts for August 2016:   How Risky Are ETFs? Last year’s “flash crash” called into question the safety of ETFs and brought increased scrutiny from regulators and investment professionals. Don’t Underestimate Equities in Retirement Many retirees reflexively believe that they can live off of the interest from their investments while…

 

Investors Vote for Favorite Dividend-Paying Stocks

Many people invest in dividend-paying stocks as a source of income and for the opportunity to reinvest the dividends to purchase additional shares of stock. Generally speaking, dividend-paying companies are seen as being more financially stable and mature. In turn, the stock prices of these companies may steadily increase over time while shareholders enjoy periodic…

 

Analyzing a Stock by Its Dividend and Shareholder Yield

This week’s AAII Weekly Digest highlights these “must-read” AAII articles: High Buyback Yields James O’Shaughnessy, in the fourth edition of his book “What Works on Wall Street” found that stocks with the highest buyback yield (top 10%) outperformed the overall stock universe by an average of 3.2 percentage points a year from the start of 1927…