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This week, Morningstar held its annual Investment Conference. Attended primarily by financial advisers, the conference is notable for both its size and its mutual fund focus (though there were sessions on other topics). This week, I’ll share some of my notes and observations....

On Wednesday, The Wall Street Journal published an article headlined, “Rock-Bottom Bond Yields in Europe Hit All-Time Lows.” Thursday morning, a headline on The Financial Times’ website declared: “Relentless: Bund Yields Take Fresh Step Down.” The headlines were written...

The subject of valuing stocks by their dividend is discussed in the June AAII Journal, which was posted to our website yesterday. Specifically, Computerized Investing editor Jaclyn McClellan takes an in-depth look at Geraldine Weiss’ approach. I’m going to extend the conversation...

Effective this week, just about anyone in the U.S. can play the role of venture capitalist. New crowdfunding rules went into effect on Monday that allow non-accredited investors to risk up to $2,000 or 5% of their annual income or net worth (whichever is less) in a start-up company...

Though the impact of Alzheimer’s disease on families and friends from a lifestyle and emotional standpoint has been well-documented, little research has been done into the financial impact of caring for some afflicted by the disease. To determine the impact, the Alzheimer’s...

American Funds says that some actively managed funds are better than passive (index) funds. Specifically, the company argues that actively managed funds with low expense ratios and high levels of manager ownership (a group that Amercian Funds calls “Select Active”) outperform...

Any time a fund invests in something more esoteric than exchange-listed stocks from a developed country or widely traded high-quality bonds, the potential for something to go wrong increases. We saw this happen in December when the Third Avenue Focused Credit Fund—a mutual fund—suddenly...

Companies are very aware of our tendency, as humans, to overestimate the odds of making money. They use this to their advantage by pitching products and services as money-making opportunities that in reality are highly effective tools for separating us from our money. One bad idea...