William O’Neil’s CAN SLIM Approach to Selecting Growth Stocks

This week’s AAII Weekly Digest highlights these “must-read” AAII articles:   William O’Neil’s CAN SLIM Approach to Selecting Growth Stocks Using Fundamental and Technical Data The CAN SLIM approach is a popular investment strategy that uses fundamental company and industry factors to identify attractive stocks and employs technical price and volume analysis to help determine…

 

An Election Trend That Might Not Be Repeatable

The election day is just 11 days away, thank goodness. As it nears, articles and reports are appearing about the election’s impact on the market. We’re going to discuss the data in the November Stock Superstars Report, which will be posted online Friday evening, but I’ll share some of the data here as well. Rather…

 

AAII Sentiment Survey: Optimism Falls to Lowest Level Since June

Optimism among individual investors about the short-term direction of stock prices fell to an unusually low level, one not seen since last June. The latest AAII Sentiment Survey also shows an increase in pessimism and a decrease in the percentage of investors describing their outlook as neutral. Bullish sentiment, expectations that stock prices will rise…

 

AAII Sentiment Survey: Pessimism Rebounds

Pessimism among individual investors about stock prices dropping rebounded in the latest AAII Sentiment Survey. The rise in bearish sentiment occurred as both bullish sentiment and neutral sentiment fell. Bullish sentiment, expectations that stock prices will rise over the next six months, fell 3.3 percentage points to 25.5%. The drop puts optimism below its historical…

 

Almost Half of Polled Investors Aren’t Letting Election Impact Stock Outlook

This week’s Sentiment Survey special question asked AAII members how much influence the election is having on their expectations for the stock market relative to other factors such as earnings growth, the economy, the Fed, valuations, international factors, etc. Just under half of all respondents (49%) said that the election is either having just a…

 

Over Half of Polled Investors Still Preferring Stocks

This week’s Asset Allocation Survey special question asked AAII members what asset class (or classes) they would invest in today if given $50,000. Slightly more than half of all respondents (51%) said stocks. Dividend-paying stocks were particularly mentioned for their quarterly cash distributions. Growth and technology stocks were also favored. A few respondents said that…

 

September AAII Asset Allocation Survey: Bond Allocations Lowest in Over a Year

Fixed-income allocations among individual investors fell last month to their lowest level in over a year. The September AAII Asset Allocation Survey also shows a decline in equity allocations and a rebound in cash allocations. Stock and stock fund allocations declined 1.2 percentage points, to 65.4%. Equity allocations have now been above their historical average…

 

Almost Half of Surveyed Members Unaffected by Oil Prices

This week’s Sentiment Survey special question asked AAII members how, if at all, oil prices are affecting their outlook for the stock market in general. Just under half of all respondents (46%) said oil prices are not influencing their outlook for stocks. Some said the presidential election is having a greater impact on their sentiment….

 

AAII Sentiment Survey: Pessimism at Highest Level Since February

The percentage of individual investors expressing pessimism about the short-term direction of the stock market is at its highest level since February. This week’s AAII Sentiment Survey also shows a slight increase in neutral sentiment and a further decline in optimism. Bullish sentiment, expectations that stock prices will rise over the next six months, fell…

 

Half of Surveyed Investors Believe Valuations Too High

This week’s Sentiment Survey special question asked AAII members what their comfort level is with the current valuations of stocks. Slightly more than half of all respondents (51%) described valuations as being too high. Among the reasons cited were insufficient earnings growth to support the valuations, slow economic growth, and current valuations being higher than…