AAII Survey: Retail Investors Split as to Whether Value Premium Still Exists

In investing, value premium refers to the greater risk-adjusted return of value stocks over growth stocks. Eugene Fama and Kenneth French first identified the premium in 1992, using a measure they called HML (high book-to-market ratio minus low book-to-market ratio) to measure equity returns based on valuation. In effect, they found that stocks with low price-to-book-value ratios performed better than stocks with high price-to-book-value ratios,…

 

Using Sell Signals to Improve Results

This week’s AAII Weekly Digest highlights these “must-read” AAII articles:   Model Shadow Stock Portfolio: Special Update and Rule Changes Ahead of the next quarterly review of the Model Shadow Stock Portfolio, which will take place at the end of this month, AAII’s chairman James Cloonan reveals some key changes to the selection rules used…

 

The November 2017 AAII Journal is Now Available Online

Feature Article » Birth of an Idea: How AAII Got Started by John Bajkowski , Charles Rotblut, CFA and James B. Cloonan James Cloonan shares what led him to start AAII, along with the inside story of AAII’s Model Shadow Stock Portfolio. Features » Media Talk About James Cloonan and AAII by AAII Staff A…

 

Tweedy, Browne: “What Has Worked in Investing”

Many individual investors embody value investing—Benjamin Graham and Warren Buffett immediately come to mind. Among investment management firms, perhaps none is as devoted a follower of the principles of value investing as Tweedy, Browne Company. In his book “Smarter Stock Picking” (FT Press, 2010), David Stevenson wrote: “Graham may be the patron saint of most…

 

How to Keep Headlines From Driving Your Portfolio Decisions

On behalf of everyone at AAII, I want to say thank you to all of you who have served or are currently serving in the military. The stock market will be open Friday, Veterans Day, but banks and government offices will be closed. Big, unexpected events commonly trigger strong emotional reactions. The wiring in our…

 

Too Much Confidence Is Bad for Your Portfolio

Higher levels of confidence about one’s ability to invest lead to worse returns. I realize that this may seem counterintuitive to some of you, but this is the conclusion of a study accepted by the Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Finance (an earlier version of the study is available on SSRN). It’s yet another example of…

 

Do You Need Growth for Successful Stock Picking?

A new stock screen I created omits one characteristic that may surprise some (or perhaps many) of you: growth. Nothing in the screen requires a passing company to be growing revenues or profits. It is an admitted deviation from how I’ve previously looked for stocks. I’m not alone in omitting growth. The four AAII Stock…

 

Changes to Social Security Claiming Strategies

This week’s AAII Weekly Features highlight these valuable AAII articles: The Changes to Social Security Claiming Strategies: Couples will no longer be able to use file and suspend and restricted applications, increasing the importance of considering each spouse’s longevity. The Mathematics of Retirement Portfolios: The amount saved, the allocation followed and the withdrawal rate chosen…

 

Investor Update: Two Key Points About the Fed’s Rate Hike

Much of the chatter about yesterday’s interest rate hike by the Federal Reserve overlooks two key points. First, over the past 61 years, stocks have tended to rise during the 12-month period following the first rate hike. Secondly, it’s different this time. Put asterisks by both of those statements. I’ll start with the reassuring news….

 

Small-Cap Stock Trends

Investing is not always easy. A great deal of evidence supports the notion that over the long term, stocks of smaller companies tend to have greater returns than those of larger companies. To realize those higher long-term gains, however, you have to be willing to expect some periods of underperformance. You also have to be…