Liquidity: How Much Do You Need?

How much of a liquid balance should investment portfolios contain? That question crops up frequently in financial planning as investors try to determine their overall portfolio. The first part of the question, of course, is: “What is liquidity?” Liquidity refers to the time required—and the cost incurred—to convert assets into cash. The more quickly and…

 

For Long-Term Investors, the Focus Should Be on Risk

This week’s AAII Weekly Digest highlights these “must-read” AAII articles:   Using Reverse Mortgages to Mitigate Periods of Poor Returns A home equity conversion mortgage (HECM) line of credit, aka a reverse mortgage, provides a tool that can be used to mitigate the impacts of sequence of returns risk (the risk of incurring portfolio losses…

 

Liquidity: How Much Do You Need?

Individuals have varying needs for assets that are readily available. How does one decide the appropriate level? A Keynesian analysis comes from the late Baron of Tilton. How much of a liquid balance should investment portfolios contain? That question crops up frequently in financial planning as investors try to determine their overall portfolio. The first…

 

Trading More Frequently Leads to Worse Returns

This interview originally appeared in the November 2014 issue of the AAII Journal. What impact does active trading have on portfolio performance? Terrance “Terry” Odean, professor of Finance at the University of California, Berkeley, has done quite a bit of research into the performance of individual investors. He spoke with AAII on his studies and their…